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NONE IN THREE - preventing violence in paradise

One in three women and girls will face sexual and physical violence in their lifetime, help us make this NONE IN THREE...

Children’s experiences of domestic violence

During the Ni3 project, 1378 children (9-17 years) from Barbados and Grenada took part in a survey on lived experiences of violence, within their homes and communities. The survey design, implementation and analyses were directed by Professor Daniel Boduszek whose team included: Dr Hazel Da Breo, Dr Ena Trotman Jemmott, Dr Dominic Willmott, Dr Nikki Sherretts and Dr Agata Debowska. This, the first such survey of its kind in the region (download a copy here) revealed a high prevalence of co-occurring violence (sexual, physical and emotional) with children being the direct targets of victimisation in many instances and also, experiencing secondary trauma through witnessing abuse to others.

Professor Daniel Boduszek

Dr Hazel Da Breo

Dr Ena Trotman Jemmott

Dr Dominic Willmott

Dr Nikki Sherretts

Dr Agata Debowska

Some results:

  • 52% of children in Barbados and 60% of children in Grenada were exposed to family verbal violence directed towards their mothers or siblings.
  • Girls in both countries more likely to observe verbal violence in the family than boys.
  • Approximately 26% of children in Barbados and 47% of children in Grenada observed someone in their family being violent towards pets.
  • More than 35% of children in Barbados and 33% of children in Grenada observed non-interpersonal violence (i.e., violence directed against property, such as breaking or destroying something on purpose) perpetrated by someone in their family.
  • Boys in both countries, compared with girls, were more likely to have observed non-interpersonal violence in the family.
  • Nearly 30% of children in Barbados and approximately 40% in Grenada were exposed to physical violence in the family.
  • Almost 19% of children in Barbados and approximately 25% in Grenada were exposed to serious violent threat made by a family member and directed against their mother or siblings.
  • Nearly 28% of the Barbadian sample and almost 38% of the Grenadian sample reported to have experienced physical abuse in the family.
  • Barbadian boys were more likely to experience physical abuse in the family in comparison with Barbadian girls.
  • In excess of 9% of youths from Barbados and almost 13% from Grenada admitted having experienced sexual abuse in the family.
  • Boys in both countries were more likely to report having experienced sexual abuse in the family compared with girls.
  • Sexual abuse outside the family was more common among Barbadian boys than girls.
  • More than 13% of participating youngsters from Barbados and more than 18% from Grenada admitted having experienced sexual abuse outside the family.
  • Nearly 38% of the Barbadian sample and almost half of all Grenadian children indicated to have experienced physical abuse outside the family.
  • In Barbados, boys were more likely to experience physical abuse outside the family than girls.
  • Nearly 60% of youths in Barbados and almost 70% in Grenada reported to have experienced emotional abuse outside the family.
  • Almost 35% of youths in Barbados and almost 41% in Grenada indicated to have experienced emotional abuse in the family.
  • In Grenada, emotional abuse in the family was more common among girls than boys.
  • Grenadian girls reported more experiences of emotional abuse outside the family than boys.

Crucially, in understanding the ways in which violent behaviours become ‘normalised’ and the values that promote violence acceptance becomes perpetuated across generations, the survey indicated the high prevalence of interpersonal violence perpetrated by both men and women against their partners. Boys and girls exposed to such violence, were more accepting of it, were more likely to use aggressive and bullying behaviours themselves and demonstrated reduced empathy for victims.

Jesse – a serious computer game as an intervention to change

To raise awareness of the impact of domestic violence, to increase empathy and to promote non-violent problem solving skills, the Ni3 project has created Jesse, a computer game as an education intervention that can be used with children and also in professional training. Created by Professor Eunice Ma and Dave Smith, with additional input from Ramy Hammady, trials of Jesse have been conducted in Barbados and Grenada. Dr Boduszek designed the trial procedures and Dr Ena Trotman Jemmott and Dr Hazel Da Breo implemented the trial along with other Ni3 representatives including Sharon-Rose Gittens and Shakiel Stoute who are our featured Ni3 project team members (see below). The trial results will be released mid-January but emerging evidence provides irrefutable evidence of the effectiveness of the game in changing negative attitudes that promote the social acceptance of violence and also in increasing empathy (this is central to developing healthy interpersonal relationships). What will be required of course, is that families, schools, Churches and communities are able to help young people sustain these changes and that they too, become changed themselves.

Eunice Ma

David Smith

Ramy Hammady

Sharon Rose

Shakiel Stoute

Previous themes

None in Three Featured Video

What is None In Three?

None in Three is two-year action-oriented project funded by the EU and implemented in the Caribbean in partnership with the Sweet Water Foundation in Grenada. Supported by national and regional agencies, the project is designed to complement existing domestic violence programmes in the region and also to contribute to change at the international level. Taking its name from the fact that one in three women will experience sexual or physical violence in their lifetime, the project challenges the idea that violence to women is an inevitability and aims: 1) to increase access to justice and services for especially marginalised women, 2) to engage with men and youth about what needs to be done and 3) to prevent violence through education.

The final report of qualitative research carried out in Barbados and Grenada has now been published.

Impact

Publications

Reporting

Download information leaflet - PDF


Meet the project team

This work is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team of experts from the UK and the Caribbean.

Sharon rose Shakiel Stoute

Find out more about project team members: Sharon and Shakiel.

Previous Featured researchers


Meet the team here:

Get Involved

None in Three provides opportunities for everyone to join us in speaking out against domestic violence. If you represent an organisation, why not join our supporters' network, or add your own voice by commenting on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (please also share the information with others). Perhaps you would be willing to become a None in Three representative, or join in the discussion around our conversation piece on the role of social workers.

Untold Stories

Maya Angelou, poet and civil rights activist once said. "There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you". If you have an untold story of domestic violence, telling it on our new Survivor's Blog Spot might help to share the load of carrying it. If you have a story of elder abuse perhaps this might compel more of us to speak out.

Message by EU Ambassador Mikael Barfod

EU Ambassador Mikael Barfod

The Delegation of the European Union to Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean is proud to support this new project which aims to prevent domestic violence in the region.

Read the Ambassador's full statement here.

EU Flag

None in Three is funded by the European Union

Launched in celebration of International Women's Day 2016, None in Three will run for two years.